The Ohio State University

 
Lifespan Adjustment Project
 
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Lifespan Adjustment Project
People 
 

Lab brunch, 2017



Research Coordinator



  Kristen Fernhoff

phone: 614.292.3155

email:fernhoff.1@osu.edu





Graduate Students


    Tiffany Shader

graduate student on internship
(Compass Health, Rolla Missouri)


email: shader.4@osu.edu

Research Interests


I am interested in the causes and correlates of externalizing behavioral disorders among children and adolescents, particularly intermittent explosive disorder (IED), which is new to the DSM5. I enjoy our lab’s research because of our focus on developmental psychopathology, our combined use of psychophysiology and behavioral measures, and our use of advanced statistical methods.

Recent Publications

Shader, T. M., Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Crowell, S. E., Reid, M. J., Thayer, J. F., Vasey, M. W., Webster-Stratton, C., Bell, Z., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2018). Quantifying respiratory sinus arrhythmia: Effects of misspecifying breathing frequencies across development. Development and Psychopathology, 30, 351-366.

Bell, Z. E., Seager, I., Shader, T., & Fristad, M. A. (2018). Updating the textbook: A novel approach to training graduate students in evidence-based youth practices. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 25, 1-6.  

Bell, Z., Shader, T. M., Webster-Stratton, C., Reid, M. J., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2017). Improvements in negative parenting mediate changes in children’s autonomic responding following a preschool intervention for ADHD. Clinical Psychological Science, 6, 134-144.

Beauchaine, T. P., Shader, T., & Hinshaw, S. P. (2016). An ontogenic process model of externalizing psychopathology. In T. P. Beauchaine & S. P. Hinshaw (Eds.), Oxford handbook of externalizing spectrum disorders (pp. 485-501). New York: Oxford University Press.

Beauchaine, T. P., & McNulty, T. (2013). Comorbidities and continuities as ontogenic processes: Toward developmental spectrum model of externalizing behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 25, 1505-1528.


  Dana Kamara

sixth-year graduate student

phone: 614.292.3155
email: kamara.42@osu.edu

Research Interests

My research interests focus broadly on improving quality of life for children and families affected by neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDDs), including autism spectrum disorder, Down syndrome, and others. This includes improving methods and access to early identification and interventions. Recently, I’ve become interested in the nature of sleep impairment in NDDs—a common vulnerability that may shed light on etiological mechanisms, and a potential intervention target that can improve quality of life for children and families.

Recent Publications:

Dawson, G., Jones, E. J. H., Merkle, K., Venema, K., Lowy, R., Faja, S., Kamara, D., Murias, M., Greenson, J., Winters, J., Smith, M., Rogers, S., & Webb, S. J. (2012). Early behavioral intervention is associated with normalized brain activity in young children with autism. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 51, 1150-1159. 

Faja, S., Webb, S. J., Jones, E., Merkle, K., Kamara, D., Bavaro, J., Aylward, E., & Dawson, G. (2012). The effects of face expertise training on the behavioral performance and brain activity of adults with high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 278-293.


Ziv Bell

fifth-year graduate student

phone: 614.292.3155
email:
bell.1344@osu.edu

Research Interests

I am interested in the use of psychophysiological, behavioral, and neuroimaging methods to better understand psychopathology across development in children and adolescents. My current research focuses on the relationships between psychophysiology, parent-child interactions, and externalizing behaviors.

Recent Publications

Bell, Z., Webster-Stratton, C., Reid, M. J., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2018). Improvements in negative parenting mediate changes in children’s autonomic responding following a preschool intervention for ADHD. Clinical Psychological Science, 6, 134-144. 

Shader, T. M., Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Crowell, S. E., Reid, M. J., Thayer, J. F., Vasey, M. W., Webster-Stratton, C., Bell, Z., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2018). Quantifying respiratory sinus arrhythmia: Effects of misspecifying breathing frequencies across development. Development and Psychopathology, 30, 351-366..

Bell, Z. E., Seager, I., Shader, T., & Fristad, M. A. (2018). Updating the textbook: A novel approach to training graduate students in evidence-based youth practices. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 25, 1-6.

Young, M. E., Bell, Z. E., & Fristad, M. A. (2016). Validation of a brief structured interview: Ready for prime time clinical practice. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, 23, 327-340.


    Heather McDonough-Caplan

third-year graduate student

phone: 614.292.3155
email: mcdonough-caplan.1@buckeyemail.osu.edu

Research Interests

My research interests lie primarily in biological vulnerabilities to and social risk factors for development of self-injury among adolescent girls. In the future, I would like to take part in developing preventive interventions that reduce the likelihood that vulnerable girls will develop future self-injury.

Recent Publications

McDonough-Caplan, H. M., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2018). Conduct disorder: A neurodevelopmental perspective. In M. M. Martel (Ed.), Developmentla pathways to disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders. Elsevier.

McDonough-Caplan, H., Klein, D. N., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2018). Comorbidity and continuity of depression and conduct problems from elementary school to adolescence. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 127, 326-337. 

Johnson, I. R. & McDonough-Caplan, H. (2016). Implicit-explicit evaluative discrepancies in depression and information seeking. Social Cognition, 34, 238-253.


  Hunter Hahn

third-year graduate student

phone: 614.292.3155
email: hahn.328@osu.edu

Research Interests

My research interests include using experimental methods to explore social and behavioral factors that contribute to engagement in health risk behaviors across adolescence and early adulthood. I use these methods to study development of health disparities among sexual minorities (lesbian, gay, bisexual and other non-heterosexual individuals).

Recent Publications

Thamotharan, S., Hall, S., Hahn, H., Blake, J., & Fields, S. (2018). Contextualizing gender and acculturative influences on sexual initiation of Asian Indian emerging adults. Sexuality and Culture, 22, 380-390.  

Hahn, H., You, D. S., Sferra, M., Hubbard, M., Thamotharan, S., & Fields, S. (2018). Is it too soon to meet? Examining differences in geosocial networking app use and sexual risk behavior of emerging adults. Sexuality and Culture, 22, 1-21.

Rogers, A. H., Seager, I., Haines, N., Hahn, H., Aldao, A., & Ahn, W.-Y. (2017). The indirect effect of emotion regulation on minority stress and problematic substance use in lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1881.

Thamotharan, S., Hahn, H., & Fields, S. (2017). Drug use status in youth: The role of gender and delay discounting. Substance Use and Misuse, 103, 1-10.  


    Nate Haines

third-year graduate student


phone: 614.292.3155
email: haines.175@osu.edu


Research Interests


I am interested in intersections among neuroscience, quantitative psychology, and clinical psychology. I use computational modeling in combination with neuroimaging techniques such as fMRI to better understand neural mechanisms underlying addiction and reward processing. My goal is to create objective test measures that can supplement current clinical diagnostic tools, eventually leading to more effective, individualized treatment plans.

Recent Publications

Ahn, W.-Y., Haines, N., & Zhang, L. (2017). Revealing neuro-computational mechanisms of reinforcement learning and decision-making with the hBayesDM package. Computational Psychiatry, 1, 24-57.

Rogers, A.H., Seager, I., Haines, N., Hahn, H., Aldao, A., & Ahn, W.-Y. (2017). The indirect effect of emotion regulation on minority stress and problematic substance use in lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1881. 




Alumni


    Aimee Zisner

University of Colorado School of Medicine