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Lifespan Adjustment Project
RESEARCH


 
Click here to access a recent presentation at The Ohio State Department of Psychiatry 2017 Grand Rounds series in which Dr. Beauchaine describes Lifespan Adjustment Project research:

 


Specific Research Projects:



Targeting Family Conflict to Improve Health Behaviors


Funding Source: This award is supported by the National Institutes of Health Science of Behavior Change Common Fund Program through an award administered by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Collaborators: Rick Heyman, Ph.D., Antoinette Schoenthaler, Ed.D., Amy Slep, Ph.D., Tessa West, Ph.D., New York University; Robert Levenson, Ph.D., UC Berkeley

Description: The objective of this research is to devise brief interventions for parents and children (both parent-parent and parent-child) that reduce family conflict and improve health behaviors, thereby reducing risk for (1) type 2 diabetes, which is a significant contributor to coronary heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, periodontal disease, hearing loss, and lower-limb amputation; and (2) periodontal diseases, which confer vulnerability to type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Funding began in summer, 2016. Please check back for publications from this research.

Related publications:

Sumner, J., Nielson, L., & Beauchaine, T. P. (in press). An experimental medicine approach to improving health outcomes: The NIH Science of Behavior Change Research Network [Special Issue]. Behavior Research and Therapy.

Slep, A. M., Heyman, R. E., Mitnick, D. M., Lorber, M. F., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2017). Targeting couple and parent-child coercion to improve health behaviors. Behavior Research and Therapy. Epublished ahead of print.


Behavioral Intervention for Preschool Children with ADHD

Funding Source:
National Institute of Mental Health

Collaborators: Carolyn Webster-Stratton, Ph.D., University of Washington; M. Jamila Reid, Ph.D., University of Washington, Lisa Gatzke-Kopp, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Description: In this research, we modified the Incredible Years Intervention for conduct problems to treat 99 preschool children with severe attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The Incredible Years Intervention, developed by Carolyn Webster-Stratton and supported by over 30 years of research, helps prevent and treat young children's behavior problems and promote their social, emotional, and academic competencies. The program includes parent training, child training, and teacher training components, and results in improved parent-child relationships. Our intervention study demonstrated that the Incredible Years program is effective in reducing conduct problems, improving social skills, and increasing emotion regulation among young children with ADHD, without use of medication. Almost all of these improvements were maintained at one-year follow-up.

Related publications:

Bell, Z., Shader, T. M., Webster-Stratton, C., Reid, M. J., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2017). Improvements in negative parenting mediate changes in children’s autonomic responding following a preschool intervention for ADHD. Clinical Psychological Science. epublished ahead of print.

Shader, T. M., Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Crowell, S. E., Reid, M. J., Thayer, J. F., Vasey, M. W., Webster-Stratton, C., Bell, Z., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2017). Quantifying respiratory sinus arrhythmia: Effects of misspecifying breathing frequencies across development. Development and Psychopathology.

Beauchaine, T. P., Neuhaus, E., Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Reid, M. J., Brekke, A., Olliges, A., Welch, S., & Webster-Stratton, C. (2015). Electrodermal responding predicts responses to, and may be altered by, preschool intervention for ADHD. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83, 293-303.

Beauchaine, T. P., Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Neuhaus, E., Chipman, J., Reid, M. J., & Webster-Stratton, C. (2013). Sympathetic- and parasympathetic-linked cardiac function and prediction of externalizing behavior, emotion regulation, and prosocial behavior among preschoolers treated for ADHD. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 81, 481-493.

Beauchaine, T. P., & McNulty, T. (2013). Comorbidities and continuities as ontogenic processes: Toward a developmental spectrum model of externalizing behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 25, 1505-1528.

Webster-Stratton, C., Reid, M. J., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2013). One-year follow-up of combined parent and child intervention for young children with ADHD. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 42, 251-261.

Webster-Stratton, C., Reid, M. J., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2011). Combining parent and child training for young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 40, 191-203.



Brain Bases of Conduct Problems and ADHD in Adolescence


Funding source:
University of Washington Royalty Research Fund

Collaborators: Lisa Gatzke-Kopp, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Description: In this research, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare neural responses to reward and frustration among adolescent boys, ages 12-16 years, with ADHD and conduct disorder (n=19), to those of boys with no behavior problems (n=11). In some trials, participants received monetary incentives for correct responses, whereas in other trials they received no rewards for correct responses. Controls exhibited striatal activation only during reward, shifting to anterior cingulate activation during non-reward. In contrast, boys with ADHD and/or CD exhibited striatal activation during both reward and non-reward. These results suggest that ADHD and conduct problems are associated with deficits in processing omission of predicted reward, which may help explain why their impulsive behaviors often fail to extinguish when environmental contingencies change. We also evaluated (1) structural brain differences between groups, and how those predict co-occurring anxiety and depression, and (2) effective connectivity between striatal regions and prefrontal regions, which was compromised among boys with ADHD and/or CD.

Related publications:

Beauchaine, T. P., Zisner, A., & Sauder, C. L. (2017). Trait impulsivity and the externalizing spectrum. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 13.

Zisner, A., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2015). Midbrain neural mechanisms of trait impulsivity. In T. P. Beauchaine and S. P. Hinshaw (Eds.), Oxford handbook of externalizing spectrum disorders (pp. 184-200). New York: Oxford University Press. 

Sauder, C., Beauchaine, T. P., Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Shannon, K. E., & Aylward, E. (2012). Neuroanatomical correlates of heterotypic comorbidity in externalizing male adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 41, 346-352.

Beauchaine, T. P., & Gatzke-Kopp, L. M. (2012). Instantiating the multiple levels of analysis perspective in a program of study on externalizing behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 24, 1003-1018.

Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Beauchaine, T. P., Shannon, K. E., Chipman-Chacon, J., Fleming, A. P., Crowell, S. E., Liang, O., Johnson, C., & Aylward, E. (2009). Neurological correlates of reward responding in adolescents with and without externalizing behavior disorders. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 118, 203-213.

Shannon, K. E., Sauder, C., Beauchaine, T. P., & Gatzke-Kopp, L. (2009). Disrupted effective connectivity between the medial frontal cortex and the caudate in adolescent boys with externalizing behavior disorders. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 36, 1141-1157.



Development of Conduct Problems and Depression in Middle Childhood


Funding sources:
National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse

Collaborators: Lisa Gatzke-Kopp, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Both conduct problems and depression increase markedly in middle childhood. Furthermore, although conduct problems are usually directed at others, whereas depression is experienced within, these disorders co-occur at far greater levels than expected by chance. Such findings may suggest common causes, whether biological, environmental, or both. In this research project, we followed 212 middle school children across three annual assessments, and evaluated family function, psychological adjustment, and several biological markers of vulnerability.

Related publications:

Beauchaine, T. P., Zisner, A., & Sauder, C. L. (2017). Trait impulsivity and the externalizing spectrum. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 13. 

Shader, T. M., Gatzke-Kopp, L. M., Crowell, S. E., Reid, M. J., Thayer, J. F., Vasey, M. W., Webster-Stratton, C., Bell, Z., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2017). Quantifying respiratory sinus arrhythmia: Effects of misspecifying breathing frequencies across development. Development and Psychopathology.

Beauchaine, T. P., & Cicchetti, D. (Eds.). (2016). Mechanisms of comorbidity, continuity, and discontinuity in psychopathology [Special Issue]. Development and Psychopathology, 28.  

Beauchaine, T. P., & Cicchetti, D. (2016). A new generation of comorbidity research in the era of neuroscience and the Research Domain Criteria. Development and Psychopathology, 28, 891-894. 

Zisner, A., & Beauchaine, T. P. (in press). Neural substrates of trait impulsivity, anhedonia, and irritability: Mechanisms of heterotypic comorbidity between externalizing disorders and unipolar depression. Development and Psychopathology, 28, 277-291.

Pang, K. C., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2013). Longitudinal patterns of autonomic nervous system responding to emotion evocation among children with conduct problems and/or depression. Developmental Psychobiology, 55, 698-706.

Beauchaine, T. P., & Gatzke-Kopp, L. M. (2012). Instantiating the multiple levels of analysis perspective in a program of study on externalizing behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 24, 1003-1018. 

Beauchaine, T. P. (2012). Physiological markers of emotion and behavior dysregulation in externalizing psychopathology. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 77, 79-86.

Brenner, S. L., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2011). Cardiac pre-ejection period reactivity and psychiatric comorbidity prospectively predict substance use initiation among middle-schoolers: A pilot study. Psychophysiology, 48, 1587-1595.

Mead, H. K., Beauchaine, T. P., & Shannon, K. E. (2010). Neurobiological adaptations to violence across development. Development and Psychopathology, 22, 1-22.

Beauchaine, T. P., Hinshaw, S. P., & Pang, K. L. (2010). Comorbidity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and early-onset conduct disorder: Biological, environmental, and developmental mechanisms. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 17, 327-336.

Beauchaine, T. P., Klein, D. N., Crowell, S. E., Derbidge, C., & Gatzke-Kopp, L. M. (2009). Multifinality in the development of personality disorders: A Biology × Sex × Environment interaction model of antisocial and borderline traits. Development and Psychopathology, 21, 735-770.

Vasilev, C. A., Crowell, S. E., Beauchaine, T. P., Mead, H. K., & Gatzke-Kopp, L. M. (2009). Correspondence between physiological and self-report measures of emotion dysregulation: A longitudinal investigation of youth with and without psychopathology. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 50, 1357-1364.

Beauchaine, T. P., Hong, J., & Marsh, P. (2008). Sex differences in autonomic correlates of conduct problems and aggression. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 47, 788-796.

Marsh, P., Beauchaine, T. P., & Williams, B. (2008). Dissociation of sad facial expressions and autonomic nervous system responding in boys with disruptive behavior disorders. Psychophysiology, 45, 100-110.

Beauchaine, T. P., Gatzke-Kopp, L., & Mead, H. K. (2007). Polyvagal theory and developmental psychopathology: Emotion dysregulation and conduct problems from preschool to adolescence. Biological Psychology, 74, 174-184.

Shannon, K. E., Beauchaine, T. P., Brenner, S. L., Neuhaus, E., & Gatzke-Kopp, L. (2007). Familial and temperamental predictors of resilience in children at risk for conduct disorder and depression. Development and Psychopathology, 19, 701-727.

Gatzke-Kopp, L., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2007). Prenatal nicotine exposure and the development of conduct disorder: Direct and passive effects. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 38, 255-269.

Kopp, L., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2007). Patterns of psychopathology in the families of children with conduct problems, depression, and both psychiatric conditions. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 35, 301-312.

 

Development of Self-Inflicted Injury in Adolescence

Funding sources:
National Institute of Mental Health, Seattle Children's Hospital

Collaborators: Sheila Crowell, Ph.D., University Of Utah; Christina Derbidge, Ph.D., University of Utah

In these two research projects (Crowell, Derbidge), we are evaluating (1) biological vulnerabilities (e.g., low serotonin levels, low heart rate variability, abnormal brain responses to reward and emotion evocation), (2) family dysfunction (invalidation, coercion), and (3) how biological vulnerabilities and family dysfunction interact to predict development of self-inflicted injury among adolescent girls. These studies demonstrate that neither biological vulnerability nor familial risk predict development of self-injury. In combination, however, they account for most of the variance in self-injury outcomes. Our ultimate objective is to gain a better understanding of self-inflicted injury so we can improve interventions.

Related publications:

Crowell, S. E., Butner, J., Wiltshire, T. J., Munion, A. K., Yaptangco, M., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2017). Evaluating emotional and biological sensitivity to maternal behavior among depressed and self-injuring adolescent girls using nonlinear dynamics. Clinical Psychological Science, 5, 272-285. 

Kaufman, E., Puzia, M. F., Mead, H. K., Crowell, S. E., McEachern, A., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2016). Children’s emotion regulation difficulties mediate the association between maternal borderline and antisocial symptoms and youth behavior problems over one year. Journal of Personality Disorders, 31, 170-192.

Sauder, C. L., Derbidge, C. M., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2016). Patterns of neural responding to monetary incentives among self-injuring adolescent girls. Development and Psychopathology. 28, 277-291.

Beauchaine, T. P. & Zalewski, M. (2016). Physiological and developmental mechanisms of emotional lability in coercive relationships. In T. J. Dishion & J. J. Snyder (Eds.), Oxford handbook of coercive relationship dynamics (pp. 39-52). New York: Oxford University Press.

Beauchaine, T. P., Crowell, S. E., & Hsiao, R. (2015). Post-dexamethasone cortisol, self-inflicted injury, and suicidal ideation among depressed adolescent girls. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 43, 619-632.

Crowell, S. E., Derbidge, C., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2014). Developmental approaches to understanding self-injury and suicidal behaviors. In M. K. Nock (Ed.), Oxford handbook of suicide and self-injury. New York: Oxford University Press.

Crowell, S. E., Kaufman, E., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2014). A biopsychosocial model of borderline personality development: Theory and empirical evidence In J. Tackett & C. Sharp (Eds.), Handbook of borderline personality disorder in children and adolescents (pp. 143-158). New York: Springer.  

Derbidge, C., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2014). A developmental model of self-inflicted injury, borderline personality, and suicide risk. In M. Lewis & K. Rudolph (Eds.), Handbook of developmental psychopathology (3rd ed., pp. 521-542). New York: Springer.   

Crowell, S. E., Baucom, B. R., Yaptangco, M., Bride, D., Hsiao, R., McCauley, E., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2014). Dyadic conflict and emotion dysregulation in depressed and typical adolescents: Evaluating concordance across psychophysiological and observational measures. Biological Psychology, 98, 50-58.  

Crowell, S. E., Baucom, B. R., Potapova, N. V., McCauley, E., Fittleson, M., Barth, H., Smith, C. J., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2013). Mechanisms of contextual risk for adolescent self injury: Emotion invalidation and conflict escalation in mother-child interactions. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 42, 467-480.

Crowell, S. E., Beauchaine, T. P., Hsiao, R. C. J., Vasilev, C. A., Yaptangco, M., Linehan, M. M., & McCauley, E. (2012). Differentiating adolescent self-injury from adolescent depression: Possible implications for borderline personality development. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40, 45-57.

Beauchaine, T. P., Klein, D. N., Crowell, S. E., Derbidge, C., & Gatzke-Kopp, L. M. (2009). Multifinality in the development of personality disorders: A Biology × Sex × Environment interaction model of antisocial and borderline traits. Development and Psychopathology, 21, 735-770.

Crowell, S. E., Beauchaine, T. P., McCauley, E., Smith, C. J., Vasilev, C. A., & Stevens, A. L. (2008). Parent-child interactions, peripheral serotonin, and self-inflicted injury in adolescents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 15-21.

Crowell, S., Beauchaine, T. P., McCauley, E., Smith, C., Stevens, A. L., & Sylvers, P. (2005). Psychological, autonomic, and serotonergic correlates of parasuicidal behavior in adolescent girls. Development and Psychopathology, 17, 1105-1127. 



Biological Vulnerabilities to Autism Spectrum Disorder

Collaborators:
Emily Neuhaus, Ph.D., Raphiel Bernier, Ph.D., Seattle Children's Hospital

Description: In addition to the research projects outlined above, we have recently begun studying biological vulnerabilities to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This work focuses on reward processing, cognitive capabilities, emotion regulation, and social functioning among children and adolescents with ASD. Our ultimate goal is to advance scientific understanding of the causes o ASD, so more effective interventions can be developed.

Related publications:

Neuhaus, E., Bernier, R. A., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2016). Children with autism show altered autonomic adaptation to novel and familiar social partners. Autism Research, 9, 579-591.

Neuhaus, E., Bernier, R. A., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2015). Electrodermal response to reward and non-reward among children with autism. Autism Research, 4, 357-370.

Neuhaus, E., Bernier, R., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2014). Social skills, internalizing and externalizing symptoms, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44, 730-737.

Faja, S., Murias, M., Beauchaine, T. P., & Dawson, G. (2013). Reward-based decision making and electrodermal responding by young children with autism spectrum disorder during a gambling task. Autism Research, 6, 494-505.

Neuhaus, E., Beauchaine, T. P., & Bernier, R. (2010). Neurobiological correlates of social functioning in autism. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 733.748.

Munson, J., Dawson, G., Sterling, L., Beauchaine, T., Zhou, A., Koehler, E., Lord, C., Rogers, S., Sigman, M., Estes, A., & Abbott, R. (2008). Evidence for latent classes of IQ in young children with autism spectrum disorder. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 113, 439-452.



Longitudinal Study of Legal Status, Stigma, and Well-being among Diverse Couples


Funding Source:
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Collaborators:
Kimberly Balsam, Ph.D., Palo Alto University; Esther Rothblum, Ph.D., San Diego State University; Ellen Riggle, Ph.D., University of Kentucky; Sharon Scales Rostosky, Ph.D., University of Kentucky

Description: Beginning in July of 2000, same-sex civil unions were recognized in Vermont. This occurred before any other US state, Canadian province, or nation in the world recognized marriages for same-sex couples. Over 2,000 same-sex couples took advantage of the Vermont legislation during its first year. The majority of these couples came to Vermont from other US states, despite the fact that civil unions were not recognized in their home states at the time. Since 2002, the CUPPLES Project has been contacting and obtaining information from same-sex couples who obtained civil unions in Vermont during that first year, same-sex couples in their friendship circles who did not have civil unions, and heterosexual married siblings and their spouses. We continue to evaluate psychological adjustment in these groups, focusing on demographic factors, length of relationships, social support from family and friends, contact with families of origin, social activities, and division of housework, childcare, and finances. Originally called the Vermont Civil Union Project, this was the first study to examine same-sex couples in state recognized relationships.

Related publications:

Richards, M. A., Rothblum, E. D., Beauchaine, T. P., & Balsam, K. F. (2016). Adult children of same-sex and heterosexual couples: Demographic “Thriving”. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 13, 1-15.

Balsam, K. F., Beauchaine, T. P., Rothblum, E. D., & Solomon, S. E. (2008). Three-year follow-up of same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont, same-sex couples not in civil unions, and heterosexual married couples. Developmental Psychology, 44, 102-116. 

Balsam, K. F., Beauchaine, T. P., Mickey, R. M., & Rothblum, E. D. (2005). Mental health of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults and their heterosexual siblings: Effects of gender, sexual orientation, and family.Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 114, 471-476.

Balsam, K. F., Rothblum, E. D., & Beauchaine, T. P. (2005). Victimization over the lifespan: A comparison of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults and their heterosexual siblings. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 73, 477-487.

 

Please see our PUBLICATIONS page for additional information about our research.